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Harvesting Cannabis: The Guide to Take Your Bud From Plant to Bag

Is it just me? Or is harvesting cannabis the BEST part of growing your own marijuana?

Nothing is more satisfying than seeing the long and meticulous grind of growing come to fruition.

Today, you’ll learn when your cannabis plants are ready for harvest and how to harvest without ruining all of your hard work!

When is Cannabis Ready for Harvest?

Knowing when exactly to harvest is half the battle.

If you do it too soon, your yield will be less potent, but if you wait too long then the THC will start to degrade.

Waiting too long leads to a higher CBN count which equals more of a couch high than a head high.

If you’re growing just for personal use, then you may want to play around with harvesting times to see how you prefer it.

Since the high is highly dependent on when you harvest, you can nail down a perfect high for you.

To test this, you need to be growing several plants.

Harvest a different plant at varying stages and take notes of what you like the best.

That way you can recreate it on the next go around either with cloning your cannabis or by planting the same seeds.

When plants are harvested earlier they produce a more stimulating head high, and when harvested at peak you’ll experience a more numbing, hazy and psychoactive high.

If you wait till later, then your plants produce more of a body high.

To know when it’s time to harvest you need to keep an eye on a few things:

  • Color of the Pistils
  • Color of the Trichomes
  • Time
  • And the Strain of your Cannabis

What Color Should the Pistils be?

Pistils (or hairs) that are usually white throughout the growing process will start to grow orange-brown when it’s getting time to harvest.

This is just a good indicator as to when you should start paying closer attention to the trichomes.

The concept is very straightforward.

When plants are young, the pistils are white and straight.

Then, as the mature, they start to darken and become curly.

What you need to pay attention is the ratio of white pistils to darkened pistils.

Too much white and you’re yield won’t be as potent as it could be.

But wait till there is no white and your bud is going to lose a lot of its psychoactive effect from the THC.

But you can harvest based just on pistil colors using this chart:

Too Early

50-60 %
Darkened Pistils

THC Peak

60-70 %
Darkened Pistils

Too Late

70-90 %
Darkened Pistils
  • 50-60% darkened pistils indicate it’s a little too early
  • 60-70% of darkened pistils means your bud is ripe with the highest levels of THC
  • 70-90% of hairs have darkened means the THC has begun degrading, and the buds are heavy in CBN making them useful for anti-anxiety

A good rule of thumb to go by is the ⅔ rule.

When ⅔ of your pistils have changed colors, then your plants should be ready for harvest.

Also, these ratios are an interpretation that you’ll get better at recognizing over time and with practice.

So, please, don't count the pistils.​

Be Certain by Looking at the Trichomes

Your trichomes are a more tried and true way to tell if your plants are ready to harvest.

And by far the most accurate.

For this method, you need to buy a trichome magnify glass or what’s more commonly called a jeweler's loupe.

Trichomes are where the THC is produced.

These little mushroom shaped crystalline structures are often referred to as the resin glands.

They form all along the buds and leaves and are responsible for the sticky texture of bud.

At the apex of the trichome, a ball is formed; this is where you’ll look to see if the buds are ready.

You can’t see the inside of a trichome with your naked eye.

Jewler loupes operate at 50-100x, which give you a clear view of the trichomes changing colors, though.

Trichomes go through three distinct stages, and each has an enormous impact on the quality of your yield:

  • All Clear Trichomes

If most of your trichomes are clear, then you still have some time before harvest. If you were to harvest now, the potency of your plants would be significantly diminished.

  • Half of Your Trichomes are Cloudy

Theoretically, you can harvest once half of your trichomes become cloudy. Though be warned, your buds have not yet reached their full size. At this point, there is plenty of THC to get you high or help with certain medical issues. Note the high will mainly be an energetic one.

  • Most of Your Trichomes are Cloudy

Now is the peak time, and the best time to harvest your plants! Your plants will never hold more THC than they do now, and your high will be very euphoric. This is also the best time to harvest if you need your cannabis to produce pain relieving effects.

  • Your Trichomes are Amber and Cloudy

If your trichomes have begun to turn amber, then they are past the peak. This isn’t a bad thing per say. It just means the THC started to degrade. That can’t be good, right? Well, actually, if you’re looking for marijuana to help you with anxiety then this is when you need to harvest. At this point, your plants have more CBN than they do THC.

Remember:

  • Clear trichomes indicate that your plants are not ready
  • Cloudy trichomes indicate your plants THC is at its peak and is ready for harvest
  • Amber trichomes means that your plants are overripe and will have a high CBN count and give you a “couch lock” high

Autoflowering Cannabis

Some plants are bred to be at their peak at a very specific time.

These are referred to as autoflower plants.

This takes a lot of the guess work out of harvesting.

To get autoflower seeds, you’re going to have to buy it from legal avenues which make it difficult if you're living in one of the many states where it’s still illegal to grow your own cannabis.

But if you do manage to get your hands on some, they are ideal for beginners.

  • Autoflower is always ten weeks from seedling to harvest

Indica vs. Sativa Harvesting Time

Depending on the type of plant you’re growing, you can get a general idea of how long it will take from flowering to harvest.

The key thing to remember with this method is that it’s not an exact science, but it is a good way if you want to grow with a minimalist approach.

Also, these times are just general.

Even amongst the classes, the specific strains vary.

For instance, some haze strains grow much faster than their fellow sativa counterparts.

Going based on time is something a lot of outdoor growers prefer.

If you’re starting your garden in the early spring, then your indica plants will be ready around the end of September.

And around the end of October is when your Sativa will be ready.

  • Indica needs 8 weeks of flowering
  • Sativa needs 10 weeks of flowering

Should I flush?

The last couple of weeks leading up to harvest is a crucial period.

There are a few key steps growers like to take to help with the taste of the bud and help with maximizing the yield.

Flushing, or leaching, is the process of getting rid of any nutrient build-up and clearing the marijuana of any impurities.

When you take all of the nutrients out of the plants growing medium (be it soil or water), the plant is forced to use its stored food reserves.

These food reserves are sugars, starches and other junk we don’t want to smoke.

They make for a harsh smoke, but they also make the plant difficult to burn.

There are two different best practices when it comes to flushing: Forcing the nutrients out and just stop the feeding.

Related reading:

Forcing the Nutrients Out

Two weeks before harvest, you want to flood your growing medium with pure water.

Let this heavy dose of water sink in for a few minutes. This will dissolve all of the salts and nutrients.

After which you need to add more water to clear the decomposed nutrients out.

If done properly, it won’t be but a few days before you notice a nitrogen deficiency in your plants.

Calm down, though...

This IS normal.

The leaves will start to turn light green and then yellow.

You may even see reddening stems indicating a phosphorus deficiency.

To test that your plant is completely flush, eat a leaf.

Seriously.

Break off a leaf and taste the juice from the stem.

The taste will be a dead ringer.

If it tastes bitter, then there is still plant food in its system.

If it tastes like water, however, then it has been thoroughly flushed.

Just Stop the Feeding

Another method is just to stop providing nutrients two weeks before harvesting.

This is a more natural way of letting the nutrients build up to break down, but not always as effective depending on how much you’ve been feeding them.

The Final 24 Hours

A couple of days before harvesting, a lot of gardeners like to do one last flush.

Also, during the final 24 hours, you want to cut off all water entirely.

Ideally, you’re going to let your growing medium go completely dry before you begin to harvest.

To make harvesting easier, about a week before you plan to cut your plants down, remove the large fan leaves.

Especially any leaves you see fading to yellow.

Depriving your plant of water dramatically increases the resin production in the plant.

It’s not necessarily the dry soil that increases the resin, but rather the dry air.

You need the relative humidity in your garden to stay low in its final days.

Producing more resin in this situation is its natural defense mechanism to protect itself from the dry and hot conditions.

Marijuana trichomes are one of the highest UV-resistant plant compounds—period.

The plant's resin glands reflect UV rays, preventing it from being burned by the sun.

Now the Tricky Part: Harvesting Cannabis

Ideally, you want to start this process bright and early—before the lights in the grow room light up.

  • Remove your grow lights from your grow room
  • Set up a wire running across the ceiling (or at least up somewhere high if you’re not growing from a dedicated grow tent)
  • Cut the plants at their base, separating it from its root ball
  • Hang them upside down from your wire
  • Set up a large fan and aim it right beneath the plants
  • You want to keep the room at 45% humidity and 64°F

Keep an eye out for molds!

If you keep your temperature and humidity right, coupled with letting in some fresh dry air a couple of times a day, you shouldn’t have to worry, though.

Now that you’ve harvested your cannabis, you need to start to trim it and cure it.

Drying and curing is a critical step that requires a whole guide dedicated to it.

You can read ours here.

The key things to remember when starting the drying process, though, is that it needs to be done slowly.

You’re probably looking at 7-14 days if done right.

And that is not including the time it needs to cure.​

If you dry the buds too quickly, the plant will still have chlorophyll.

This makes for a bad taste when smoking, and makes the smoke rather harsh.

"This is the time to be patient. Trying to speed up this process can ruin all of your hard work."

You’ll know the buds are done drying by testing the strength of the stems.

If you bend the stem and it snaps, the buds are good to smoke.

But if it just bends, there is still too much water in the plant.

Still have questions about harvesting?

Ask away in the comments below.

We also recommend you can check out this free grow bible from our friends at ilovegrowingmarijuana.coms.

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A cannabis blog diving deep into marijuana culture. We love teaching you how to grow and enjoy cannabis more overall.

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